Seminars

SEMINARS

_____________________________________________________________

COLLEGIATE TEACHING SEMINARS

TLAD now offers two graduate elective collegiate teaching courses. Collegiate Teaching: Preparation and Reflection is a semester-long professional course for artists, designers, architects, and educators and is designed for graduate students who plan to teach during their course of study at Rhode Island School of Design and it includes a video-taped individual teaching practice session. Collegiate Studio: Discipline-centered Learning uses RISD as a site for the exploration of strategies for studio-based teaching and learning.  It incorporates effective teaching presentations through micro-teaching sessions. These courses draw upon the expertise and teaching methodologies of RISD faculty and visiting faculty and scholars from other institutions to provide graduate students with access to both fundamental and innovative models of practice. Each incorporates visiting faculty and Brown University Harriet W. Sheridan Center public lectures on teaching and learning. TLAD offers two one year graduate programs for those interested in education in the arts: the MAT program for teachers in K-12 and the MA program for those interested in community art and design, non-profits and the arts and design, leadership in  arts and design education, or a customized research program in arts and design education.

_____________________________________________________________

Past Graduates’ Teaching Portfolios

Svetlana Bailey Teaching Portfolio 2015 (photography)

Stephanie Houde Teaching Portfolio 2015  (user experience)

Sakura Kelley Teaching Portfolio 2015 (photography)

Sarah Meadows Teaching Portfolio 2015 (photography)

Thalassa Raasch Teaching Portfolio 2015  (photography)

Padma Rajendran Teaching Portfolio 2015 (printmaking)

Kaichuan Wang Teaching Portfolio 2015  (furniture)

Emily Winter Teaching Portfolio 2015 (textiles)

Sirothia Teaching Portfolio (textiles)

Horton Teaching Portfolio (painting)

EliseKirkTeachingPortfolio (photography)

Kim Teaching Portfolio (furniture)

Lowe Teaching Portfolio (printmaking)

Kiggens Teaching Portfolio (landscape architecture)

Johnson Teaching Portfolio (architecture)

Branham_Teaching Portfolio (teaching + learning in art + design)

Laurion Teaching Portfolio (Interior architecture)

Bender Teaching Portfolio (Interior Architecture)

Cole Teaching Portfolio (Printmaking)

Denny_Final Teaching Portfolio (Photography)

Hoe Teaching Portfolio (Teaching + Learning in Art + Design)

Claudia OSteen. Teaching Portfolio (Digital Media)

Allison Baker Teaching Portfoliol (Sculpture)

Adam Porter_Teaching Portfolio (Printmaking)

Khanh Luu_Teaching Portfolio (Interior Architecture)

Anya_Sellsted Teaching Portfolio (Architecture)

____________________________________________________________

Collegiate Studio Spring Seminar

Using RISD as a site for the exploration of strategies for studio-based teaching and learning at the college level is the goal of the course. It is designed for students who will be teaching during the course of study at RISD or who plan to teach in higher education after graduation. The course draws upon the varying expertise and teaching methodologies of RISD faculty and visiting faculty from other institutions to provide graduate students with models of practice. Learning to teach in a generative and attentive manner can bring teaching closer to one’s studio practice. The course is composed of readings, reviews, discussion, project assignments, lectures, and peer presentations. The final outcome will be formation of a condensed teaching portfolio including a teaching philosophy, course proposals, a detailed syllabus, sample class assignments and assessment guides.

Students who have already taken a Collegiate Teaching Preparation and Reflection seminar may continue with this course and investigate a particular topic in collegiate teaching and complete a full and expanded teaching portfolio.

2016 055G Collegiate Studio Syllabus

First Class

Philosophy Assignment

Teaching Philosophy Readings and Guide

http://cei.umn.edu/support-services/tutorials/writing-teaching-philosophy

____________________________________________________

Second Class

Peer Review of Teaching Philosophies

sotl-in-higher-education-marian-mccarthy

Assignment:

2016 Best Practices in Course Descriptions

Complete three course descriptions and bring hard copies to third class.

FOR THE Monday FEB. 29TH BROWN LECTURE 5:30 pm
Lower Auditorium Salomon Hall (NE corner of Brown University Quad off of the corner of Waterman and Prospect Streets) No need to sign Brown attendance roster. To get a seat arrive at 5:15

Please read these articles:

Persuasive Communication

The Listening Mind

How to Persuade with Ethos Logos and Pathos by Lincoln Mullen http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/how-to-persuade-with-ethos-pathos-or-logos/35431

2. Please research course descriptions on the web outside of RISD, review course proposals in RISD past graduates’ teaching portfolios listed above, and then write 3 course proposals of your own. (basic, advanced, elective)

Due Course Description Assignment

_______________________________________________

Third Class March 3

Due Dates to Mid Term

Small Group Review of Course Descriptions

Due: Revised Teaching Philosophy in Word Doc form with Last Name_Philosophy label.

Assignment:  Moving a Course Description to a Basic Syllabus

Read these items:

Backward Design

RISD Academic Affairs syllabus_guidelines

Sheridan Center Constructing a Syllabus

Course_Goals

Teaching Goals Inventory and Self- Scorable Worksheet

Select one course description and revise it after our group discussion.

Use your revised course description and follow it with  course goals, objectives, methods into a basic structure of a weekly plan showing  basic  repeatables such as:

projects or assignments

resources such as readings, field trips, museum classes

critical feedback in work days, critiques, self-reflections

growth in demonstrations and conceptual thinking

——————————————————————

FOURTH CLASS  

Syllabus Functions

Jan Tullis Sample Syllabus

__________________________________________

FIFTH CLASS  March 17  Microteaching Sessions

Revised Course Descriptions  Emailed to Nancy

Micro teaching Sessions  Come only to your section:

9:00 to 10:30 am  Julia, Tianguitao, Chris, Joshua, Liza

10:30 to Noon  Mara, Jillian, Alex, Yujung, Stacy, Margaret

class-project-assignment-2015

______________________________________

SIXTH CLASS  March 24

Case Study or Faculty Interview

Roundtable Conversation

______________________________________

______________________________________

Upcoming Classes:

Variety in Critique Formats

Qualities of a successful syllabus plan

SEVENTH CLASS

Class Project Assignment

Assignment

feedback-form-assignment

Conditions Under Which Assessment Supports Students’ Learning

________________________________________

Group: 4/7/16

Collegiate Studio Due Dates

Faculty Interview or Case Study

Syllabus Review

Handouts for: Varying Critique Formats, Leading by Questions

__________________________________________________________

Group: 4/14/16     

Mid-term Feedback Form  due in hard copy …include open-ended questions and Likert Scale Questions

Class Project and Assessment Rubric Assignment due 4/21/16 in hard copy.

Guests:

Dean Joanne Stryker  Teaching Tips, Hiring Practices, Tenure Mentoring.  Foundation Teaching.

Shona Mc Andrews, Painting Graduate Student, Teaching Tips as a Graduate Student

__________________________________________________________

Individual Meetings:   4/21/16 

Reviews: Bring hard copies of portfolio

Class Project with Description, Methods Goals, Objectives, Competency Qualities

Assessment Rubric for Course

Faculty Interview by Stacy Smith Interview with Professor Michael Rogers

Blooms Taxonomy Action Verbs

Blooms Taxonomy

Guide to Critical Thinking

__________________________________________________________

Group:    4/28/16 

Article Roundtable

Part-time faculty Simonette Quamina and Graduate Student Instructor

_________________________________________________________

Group:    5/5/16

Presentation  of Teaching Portfolio    10 minute presentations.

Highlight the key points of your teaching philosophy. Give evidence of these ideas in your syllabus.  Go over in detail one aspect of your portfolio.

__________________________________________________________

Email:    5/12/16  

Final Submission of Teaching Portfolio                                                                                                                                          Due in PDF format

Last Name 2016 Final Portfolio

 

 

 

 

______________________________________________________________Past Seminars Guests

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 5  Lecture Panel CIT 103

Jed Morfit, MFA 2009 Sculpture, Associate Professor, Richard Stockton University, New Jersey  will speak about balancing a professional studio practice and an academic life.

Annette Cyr , Associate Professor, National University, California will talk about teaching in changing systems of a large university system i.e, classes that are both online and in the studio, that are one month long, and in an academic setting where one can pick any 9 months out of 12 months to teach a single class per month.

Jorge Garcia Patricio, Critic, RISD will talk about teaching studio on-line; the pros and cons and tips.

Collegiate Teaching UPDATED DUE DATES

__________________________________________

TENTH CLASS

THURSDAY SEMINAR NOVEMBER 19, 2015: 

You may change amongst yourselves, if needed.
We  meet in CIT 217.
6:00 Nicole Nancy + Professor Masha Ryskin
6:20 Gabriela Nancy + Professor Masha Ryskin
6:40 Maggie Nancy + Professor Masha Ryskin
7:00 Tenzing Nancy + Critic Chris Sancombe
7:20 Maria Nancy + Critic Chris Sancombe
7:40 Zachary Nancy + Professor Masha Ryskin
8:00 Stuart Nancy + Professor Masha Ryskin
8:20 Shona Nancy + Professor Masha Ryskin

Please do these steps before our meetings:
1. View your video and reflect on your own observations and suggestions. Videos are still on the desktop of CIT’s computer.
2. Read your peer review observations and suggestions
3. Be prepared to speak first about your own reflections

FRIDAY SEMINAR  NOVEMBER 20, 2015  CIT 217

9:00 Aly 9:30 Peter 10:00 Andrea 10:30 Zachary 11:00 Matt

Nabil, Brendan, Zhihao we will schedule you individually if Patti Phillips is available on a different date that is also convenient to you.

Please do these steps before our meetings:
1. View your video and reflect on your own observations and suggestions. Videos are still on the desktop of CIT’s computer.
2. Read your peer review observations and suggestions
3. Be prepared to speak first about your own reflections

______________________________________________

BOTH THURSDAY AND FRIDAY SEMINARS MEET AN EXTRA DAY ON  MONDAY NOVEMBER 30th 

5:30 pm Sheridan Center Lecture

Salomon Hall 001, Center Green, Brown University

Cognitive Learning Styles: take notes and incorporate concepts into your syllabus and show how this is in evidence in your final class Portfolio Presentation.

__________________________________________________

FINAL CLASS

Thursday December 3 and Friday December 4

Presentations of Portfolio

Criteria for Syllabus 2015

Guide to Critical Thinking

____________________________________________________

Past Seminar Items

Collegiate Studio Spring Seminar

Using RISD as a site for the exploration of strategies for studio-based teaching and learning at the college level is the goal of the course. It is designed for students who will be teaching during the course of study at RISD or who plan to teach in higher education after graduation. The course draws upon the varying expertise and teaching methodologies of RISD faculty and visiting faculty from other institutions to provide graduate students with models of practice. Learning to teach in a generative and attentive manner can bring teaching closer to one’s studio practice. The course is composed of readings, reviews, discussion, project assignments, lectures, and peer presentations. The final outcome will be formation of a condensed teaching portfolio including a teaching philosophy, course proposals, a detailed syllabus, sample class assignments and assessment guides.

Students who have already taken a Collegiate Teaching Preparation and Reflection seminar may continue with this course and investigate a particular topic in collegiate teaching and complete a full and expanded teaching portfolio.

_____________________________________________________ First Week

SoTL SoTL in Higher Education Marian McCarthy

Assignment Creating a Teaching Philosophy

Preparing at Teaching Philosophy: Teaching Philosophy Guides

Developing a Philosophy of Teaching Statement

Assignment:

Due  Create a 1-2 page teaching philosophy. Please bring a hard copy to class.

_____________________________________________________________

Second Week 

Peer reviews of teaching philosophies.

Assignments

1.

Due  Brown lecture

Please read these articles:

Persuasive Communication

The Listening Mind Doree Allen

How to Persuade with Ethos Logos and Pathos by Lincoln Mullen http://chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/how-to-persuade-with-ethos-pathos-or-logos/35431

2. Please research course descriptions on the web outside of RISD, review course proposals in RISD past graduates’ teaching portfolios listed above, and then write 3 course proposals of your own. (basic, advanced, elective)

Due  Course Description Assignment 

3.

Prepare for a 5-minute microteaching session

From the Center for Teaching and Learning University of Texas:

Microteaching is a method for providing pre-service or beginning teachers with teaching experience targeted at developing specific behaviors or skills. It is particularly useful for this purpose because it is conducted in a low-risk environment. It is a simulated teaching experience in that the size of the class is typically smaller and the length of instruction is abbreviated. Generally, microteaching involves teaching to one’s peers. It also differs from traditional field-based teaching experience in that it includes intensive planning, support, and feedback. Previous research provides strong support for using micro teaching to prepare future teachers. The student teacher studies a specific teaching skill. Next, the student teacher applies this skill typically through teaching 4-5 peers a short lesson. 

MICROTEACHING SESSION GUIDELINES

4.

Due

Faculty Interview or Case Study Roundtable

_____________________________________________________________

Third Week 

Attend the Sheridan Center Lecture Persuasive Communication  in the downstairs auditorium in Salomon Hall 001 Brown University.

Get there by 5:15 to get a seat. This lecture is very popular. Do not sign in at the attendance sheet for Brown attendees.

________________________________________________________

Fourth Week  

Peer Review of Course Description Assignment

Assignment:

1. Read

Backward Design

Constructing a Syllabus Backward Design

2. Select and revise  one of your course descriptions and begin a first draft syllabus.

Develop  a foundational syllabus: restate course aims (goals) and objectives (learning outcomes) after the course description;  establish the percentage of the grade that each learning outcome will constitute; and divide your learning outcomes into a plan of weeks and start to build a sequence of learning steps for the course.  For your syllabus, the weekly schedule is a more detailed plan than just a schedule. It has repeatable methods listed and developed, it may pose questions that lead the course, and has learning outcomes listed in sub sections of the plan or weekly in the plan.

Additional Resources:

CourseLearningObjectivesValue

______________________________________________________

Fifth Week 

Microteaching Sessions

5 Minute classes

10 Minute peer discussion of observations and suggestions.

TeachingGoalsInventory

Course_Goals

____________________________________________________

Sixth Week 

This class we will:

Complete Microteaching Sessions

Discuss First Draft of Syllabus and Teaching Inventory Goals

Review Class Project Assignment

Upcoming Assignments and Due Dates:

First Draft of Syllabus

Case Study or Faculty Interview Roundtable

Leading Small Groups and Discussions https://teachingcommons.stanford.edu/resources/teaching/small-groups-and-discussions

Class Projects, Assessment Rubric, Individual Meetings

Article Summary, Feedback Form

Individual Meetings

Final Teaching Portfolio Presentation 8-10 minutes each

Class Project Assignment 

___________________________

Seventh Week Spring Break

___________________________

Eighth Week 

Roundtable presentation of faculty interview or case study.

Sample Faculty Interview

Sample Faculty Interview

Ninth Week 

Guests RISD Associate Dean of Faculty Tracie Constantino

Please read this article before Tracie’s visit.

Critical Friends Group

RISD Distance Learning by Amy Horschak

We will catch up with the Faculty Interviews, Case Studies and syllabi, class project too and then we will review the next final assignments.

Tenth Week 

We will  review these together to see how they connect and what components need strengthening.

Assignment will be handed out during the individual meeting.

Feedback Form Assignment

_________________________________________________

Eleventh Week

This week we will start with the case study or faculty interview roundtable. If you have visuals you would like to present, I have a clicker so we can stay seated and view these as a group. If not, the goal is to share information and engender a discussion.

By this week we will have completed:

A Brown Sheridan Center lecture
A micro teaching session with group feedback
Guests: Associate Dean of Faculty and Assistant Director of Teaching  Technology
Peer to Peer Reviews
Small Group Reviews
Individual Reviews
Assignments:
Teaching Philosophy
3 Course Descriptions
Basic Syllabus
Class Project
Mid-term Feedback Form
A case study or faculty interview

I will give you two items this week:
the final assignment: creating a grading rubric this week.
A self-guided form of review for your syllabus.

In the final presentation remember your micro teaching skills and talk about your philosophy and then show us the range of your courses, and your syllabus. You can go in more depth with a class project or any aspect that interests you or that you want feedback in. The group will see how you have implemented your teaching philosophy in the documents.

At this presentation, you may add visuals to your documents. You may show a hard copy presentation portfolio, or you may sit amongst us and use the clicker to show your slides.

You will have one week to edit and amend or add to your portfolio before sending me via email. the  I will post all of your portfolios under our seminar on http://www.collegiateteachinginartanddesign.com after this date for each of you to see.

Paricio Grading Rubric for Assignments

Hirst Grading Rubric

Feedback:Assessment Study

Evaluation of Syllabus Total of 100 points

Blooms Taxonomy

Blooms Taxonomy Action Verbs

_______________________________________________

Twelfth week

The agenda will include this: Guests, Rubric and Feedback Forms, Three Roundtable Presentations, Guide to Final Presentations.

Masha Ryskin who was just hired for an ongoing full time position at RISD in Foundations Studies. Masha has worked part time at several academic institutions and is a Fulbright Fellow. She can answer your questions about long term teaching part time and moving into a full time position, keeping an active professional career, and advancing best practices in teaching studio at the collegiate level.

Allison Baker (MFA RISD Sculpture Department 2015) who has been offered an ongoing full time position at Hamline University in St. Paul. She will share with you her application strategy, her teaching portfolio, and her interview processes all this while completing her MFA.

What key questions you would like to ask each of them? This is your time to find out real-time-current processes to combine an academic and professional art and design future.

We will finish our roundtable discussions with Stephanie, Jacob and Svetlana.

We will share each other’s rubrics for grading for your syllabus and the one page mid-term feedback forms, and share a  guide to the final presentation on Thursday May 7th.

—————————————————————————————–

Thirteenth Week

 Teaching Portfolio Presentations

1.

Please prepare a short 8 to 10 minute digital presentation of your teaching portfolio.

Think of the elements of the micro-teaching sessions as a model; this is the bookend of the first presentation. Please time yourself ahead of class so we can move through every student fairly. Vary your pacing with some overview and some focus in one or two areas. Please put your pdf or powerpoint on the desktop computer at the beginning of class so there is a smooth transition from graduate to graduate. This type of presentation can be incorporated into interview presentations along with your artist or designer talks. I will have a clicker if you want to use it.

Have an opening, a middle and a summary; pose one or two pertinent questions and elicit responses that will help your development for the final written submission; highlight key points and show selected evidence of what you have done in digital projection.

Here are sample prompts for your presentation:

What are the tenets of your philosophy and where did you transpose these in your documents?

What are the few special items that represent your document the best…a class project, the sequence of classes and the progression of critical thinking as shown in the outcomes, the ways the course description and weekly plan correlate in goals and outcomes, etc?

What are examples of added visuals, resources, readings, subdivisions, subtitles, use of seminal texts, or extra effort that you have added to your syllabus or documents to give it depth and individuation.

2.

In the presentation, please at least briefly show the last two assignments:

mid-term feedback form ( with the goals of the class at the top of the form and both Likert scaled and open-ended questions.)

grading rubric for the syllabus (also called a framework.)
We will go in alphabetical order, with a few minutes of feedback after each.
Final Documents:
philosophy with examples of tenets
3 course proposals, each with goals and outcomes
syllabus: goals+outcomes with percentage of grade, weekly plan + outcomes
class project with goals, outcomes and benchmarks of competency
mid-term feedback form with goals, Likert scale + open-ended questions.
syllabus grading rubric with competency descriptions or words for levels
This presentation is not your final grade, but it allows you to focus on what needs work, what you have accomplished, and for feedback. It is a reflective summary of what you have learned and applied to your document thus far.

Baker Sample Interview Questions

Guide to Critical Thinking

Creative Thinking Value Rubric

Fundamentals of College Teaching Mintz

Classroom Assessment Techniques by Angelo and Cross

Curriculum Development in Studio Teaching  Zehner , Forsyth, Musgrave, Neale, de la Harpe, Peterson, Frankham

Brian Hayden, Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning  Teaching to Variation

A Handbook for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education  Enhancing Academic Practice  Heather Fry, Steve Ketteridge, Stephanie Marshall

Innovative Higher Education is a refereed scholarly journal that strives to package fresh ideas in higher education in a straightforward and readable fashion. The four main purposes of Innovative Higher Education are: (1) to present descriptions and evaluations of current innovations and provocative new ideas with relevance for action beyond the immediate context in higher education; (2) to focus on the effect of such innovations on teaching and students; (3) to be open to diverse forms of scholarship and research methods by maintaining flexibility in the selection of topics deemed appropriate for the journal; and (4) to strike a balance between practice and theory by presenting manuscripts in a readable and scholarly manner to both faculty and administrators in the academic community.

_____________________________________________________

Graduate Elective Seminars

__________________________________________________________

Spring  Color Research

____________________________________________

Week One

2015 Color Research Syllabus

Wilton Great Age of Watercolors

Color Defnitions

________________________________________

Week Two

Color Critique

Color Wheel 

Glazing Study Chart

Assignment:

WASH AND GOUACHE_Cohn

Prepare a Color PPT 5-8 minutes each.

____________________________________________

Week Three

Review of color wheels and glazing charts. Powerpoint presentations.

Assignment:

1. 

a. Read and use the Reading Response Prompts to write a reader response summary of the article. 

b. MODERN CHROMATICS_Rood

c. Reading Response Prompts

2. Pick two artists or designers and analyze, compare and contrast  the color usage for an 5-8 minute powerpoint.  Do a color project in response to your presentation in any medium and to any aspect of the presentation.

_________________________________________

 Week Four:

Color Presentations continue

Sharing in roundtable format of your response work.

___________________________________________

Week Five:

Meet in Museum on Friday March 13 at 10:00 am in lobby of Chace Center Entrance off of North Main Street.

ASSIGNMENT: Read CHROMOPHOBIA_by David Batchelor and write a response paper.

Reading Response Prompts

Extra opportunities:

Museum Items like this list are available for your own viewing during Siskind Hours on the 4th Floor of the RISD Museum in Prints, Drawings, and Photographs.  You can view at your leisure 10 – 12:30 both Monday and Fridays during fall and spring semesters.  Friese is in the Prints Drawings and Photographs Department  every Wednesday if there are items you would like to view.

______________________________________________

Megan Tamas Color Studies

Megan Tamas (Sculpture MFA 2015) Color Research Project 2014 

http://www.jongeriuslab.com  Helle Jongerius 300 color vases 2010

096_colouredvases3_08

Friday March 20

FINISH COLOR PRESENTATIONS

Reflect on readings and museum visits.

Color Interaction Studies from David Hornung’s Color Workshop Text. 

Assignment: Color Interaction Project

Friday, April 3rd: Individual Meetings Midterm
Bring in all past work including color interaction studies, color wheel, glazing study. Bring a paragraph printed proposal for a series for the rest of the semester. 

Tentative Schedule
Ms. Chao Yu Chen 8:30 
Mr. Nicolas J. Der 8:50
Ms. Yue Du 9:10
Ms. Carter Grickis 9:30
Ms. Yi Ning Ku 9;50
Mr. Juan C. Noguera 10:10
Mr. Rory C. Stevens 10:30
Mr. Chanon Wangkachonkait 10:50
Ms. Sarah L. Wedge 11:10
Ms. Lena Wunderlich 11:30
Ms. Hye Seong Yun 11:50

_________________________________________________

Friday April 24

By consensus, we are having individual reviews this week Friday April 24.

We will meet in the regular classroom CIT 217.

8:45 Chao Yu
9:00 Nick
9:15 Meredith
9:30 Carter
9;45 Yi Ning
10:00 Juan
10:15 Rory
10:30 Chanon
10:45 Sarah
11:00 Lena
11:15 Hye Song

We will discuss your progress individually. Use the time not in the meeting devoted to advancing your Color Research. You may change meeting times amongst yourselves if needed.

Reading;

COLOR_Natural History of the Palette_Finlay

___________________________________________________

Total Color Readings for Reading Responses Final PDF: Due Friday May 15th.

Wilton Great Age of Watercolors

WASH AND GOUACHE_Cohn

MODERN CHROMATICS_Rood

CHROMOPHOBIA_Batchelor

COLOR_Natural History of the Palette_Finlay

Reading Response Prompts

EXTRA READINGS

Interaction of Color and Electronic Media

+++++++

Why Color Theory?

http://www.radiolab.org/story/211119-colors/

radiolab shared by graduate Rory Stevens

++++++++

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2014/05/color-book/

shared by Jan Howard,  Chief Curator, RISD Museum

________________________________________________

Friday May 1   Room CIT 217 for drop in critiques.

Friday May 8  Final group critique. 

Please bring your final project to present. Each person will talk briefly about what they have done and pose one opening question to the group. We will time our sessions so each presentation is equal. Count on a total of 10-12 minutes per each person. Please bring in any previously unfinished or unseen projects like the color wheel, glazing chart or color studies also.

Saturday May 9th 12:30 pm CIT I-Park Residency Field Trip

Optional field trip to I-Park Residency Program in East Haddam,CT on Saturday May 9th. We will car pool and leave from CIT at 12:30 pm and return by 5 pm. We will see the residency grounds, see studio spaces and meet the Director Joanne Paradis. Each of you can apply and be selected to attend this residency with the work you have done for this seminar.

I-Park is both an open air and a closed studio laboratory for individual creative pursuits in the fields of music composition/sound art, the visual arts, architecture, moving image, creative writing and landscape/garden/ecological design. It also initiates and sponsors specially-themed inter-disciplinary and collaborative projects for the purpose of moving these ideas out of the laboratory and bringing them to life in the field. I-Park supports these investigations through its international artists-in-residence program, the aesthetic engagement of its natural and built environments and with on-site exhibitions, performances and collegial exchanges.  I-Park.org
I-Park Foundation, Inc.
428 Hopyard Road
East Haddam, CT 06423 Office number: 860-873-2468.

Directions:
Get off I-95 South at Exit 70 (Rte 156/Old Lyme). At the end of the ramp, head West on Rte 156. Travel 8.7 miles to the end of Rte 156. Take a right on Rte 82E and then an immediate left on Hopyard Road (you will see Fox Hopyard Golf Course on your left). Follow Hopyard Road for 4.3 miles to the end. We’re the last house on the right (dark grey house with cream colored trim), street number 428.

 ____________________________________________________________

Final Friday May 15th. Final additions for final grade. Final day reading responses are due by email in a pdf.

____________________________________________________________

Drawing Objectives: a guided drawing seminar   

2015 Friese 0658G Drawing

****

First Week:

Introductions, goals and aims.

Assignment: Limitation of using one sheet of drawing paper 22 x 30 complete a free choice drawing.

****

Second Week:

Group Critique and Metalpoint Drawing Demonstration.

Assignment:

1.Prepare a 8-10 minute ppt about artist/designers, an ism, a genre, a movement that interests you. Due: March 13

2. Prepare a metal point drawing on the Pike Cover Stock paper, using any size of it, combining it with another material such as digital, pastel, or paint. Review handout on metal point and review Susan Schwalb’s drawings in metal point at http://www.susanschwalb.com

3. Next week Feb. 26 go to Grace Church’s Mathewson Street side door at 6:30 pm to make a studio visit to Mr. Andrew Raftery. Do not meet at CIT.

l_interlunar26

Susan Schwalb “Interlunar Vibrations XXVI, 16″ x 16″ x 1.5”, 2012,
gold/aluminum/tin/silverpoint, acrylic, black gesso on wood

****

Third Week: February 26

Meet at the side door of Mathewson Street Grace Church. Grace Church entry door is one block west of Union Street and the church’s side door is between Weybossett and Westminster Streets. No class meeting at CIT.

Unknown

Unknown-1

Engravings by Andrew Raftery

****

Fourth Week: March 5

Metalpoint Review

PPT presentation

****

Fifth Week: March 11 and March 12

Wednesday March 11

Prints, Drawings and Photographs (PDP) in the RISD Museum. Meet Nancy in the lobby of Chace Center at 10:00 am.

Museum List of Prints Museum_Drawings_for_ 3_11_15

Be prepared to talk about the artist I assigned you.

Thursday March 12

PPT Presentations

Pick one artist or designer or movement you are currently interested in and give a powerpoint presentation that includes that person or movement and 5 slides of your own work too.  Bring in a new drawing that relates to the issues in your powerpoint.   This is in preparation for your independent drawing project for the rest of the semester. +- 8 minutes for each graduate.

****

Sixth Week: March 19

Drawing Project Focus and Context

Presentations of an 8-Hour Drawing: The drawing should be a testing of the direction you want your independent project to move in…tabulate when and how long you work on the piece. Total: 8 hours.
Only come to your small group. No full group meeting.
6:30 to 7:30 (Group One: Esme, Alexandra, Adam. Sunyoung)    7:30 to 8:30 (Group Two:: Shauni, Wei Lah, Sichen, Jiayen)
8:30 to 9:30 (Group Three: Eiman, Liza, Brett, Zheng,)

Assignment due for Individual Meetings April 2;

Complete three ideas/drawings for a series. Due Apr 2 Write a drawing proposal of one paragraph for the series addressing initial media, content, and process.

****

Week Seven March 26 Spring Break

****                                                  

Week Eight: April 2

Midterm: Individual Meetings with all drawings so far. Only come to your time slot. No group meeting.  Be prepared to discuss your proposal for series and also show the first 3 drawings in your    series. Individual assignments may be given. Please come in and lay your works out on an unused table or wall ten minutes before the meeting time.

6:20 Alexandra CIT 217

6:40 Shauni CIT 217

7:00 Adam CIT 217

7:20 Sunyoung CIT 217

7:40 Zheng CIT 217

8:00 Sichen CIT 217

8:20 Liza CIT 217

8:40 Jiayin CIT 217

9:00 Brett CIT 217

Monday April 13

12:00 Lena CIT 104
1:00  Esme  CIT 104

1:20 Eiman CIT 104

Tuesday April 14

9:30 Wei Lah  CIT 104

Assignment Due April 9: 3 advancing drawings in series

____________________________________________________

Thursday April 16 Small Group Critiques

___________________________________________________

Thursday April 23  Individual Critiques

6:30 Esme

6;50 Alexandra

7:10 Zheng

7:50 Shauni

8:10 Sunyoung

8:30 Liza

Thursday April 30 Individual Critiques

6:30 Wei Lah

6:50 Eiman

7:10 Seichen

7:30 Brett

7:50 Shauni

8:10 Jiayin

8:30 Esme

___________________________________________________

Thursday May 7 Final Group Critique, Final Evaluation     

___________________________________________________                         

Saturday May 9 Optional Field Trip to I-Park Residency Program East Haddam, CT

Optional field trip to I-Park Residency Program in East Haddam,CT on Saturday May 9th. We will car pool and leave from CIT at 12:30 pm and return by 5 pm. We will see the residency grounds, see studio spaces and meet the Director Joanne Paradis. Each of you can apply and be selected to attend this residency with the work you have done for this seminar.

I-Park is both an open air and a closed studio laboratory for individual creative pursuits in the fields of music composition/sound art, the visual arts, architecture, moving image, creative writing and landscape/garden/ecological design. It also initiates and sponsors specially-themed inter-disciplinary and collaborative projects for the purpose of moving these ideas out of the laboratory and bringing them to life in the field. I-Park supports these investigations through its international artists-in-residence program, the aesthetic engagement of its natural and built environments and with on-site exhibitions, performances and collegial exchanges. I-Park.org
I-Park Foundation, Inc.
428 Hopyard Road
East Haddam, CT 06423 Office number: 860-873-2468.

Directions:
Get off I-95 South at Exit 70 (Rte 156/Old Lyme). At the end of the ramp, head West on Rte 156. Travel 8.7 miles to the end of Rte 156. Take a right on Rte 82E and then an immediate left on Hopyard Road (you will see Fox Hopyard Golf Course on your left). Follow Hopyard Road for 4.3 miles to the end. We’re the last house on the right (dark grey house with cream colored trim), street number 428.

__________________________________________________________

Reading Resources:

Writing on Drawing
Essays on Drawing Practice and Research edited by Steve Garner

Porous Act of Drawing by Malone

Metal point Drawing: the History and Care of a Forgotten Art by Beth Antoine  Metalpoint_Drawing_Antoine

A Visual Turn: Comics and Art after the Graphic Novel, Amy Peltz, Art in Print March-April 2013 pp. 8-14 Comics after the Graphic Novel

Fleshing Out Those Textbook Bones; Why Diagram Is A Dirty Word. Katrina Van Grouw Chronicle of Higher Education Review pp 13-16 March 22, 2013   Fleshing out Textbook Bones:Why Diagram is a Dirty Word

Dean Smith Drawings

Wes Mills Drawing Interview

Slater Casts Wallach

Identity Chain Esme Choi

Jacqueline Humphriese Drawings http://www.greenenaftaligallery.com/artists/jacqueline-humphries/featured-works#46

_____________________________________________________________

Thesis Research 

2014 Thesis Research   

Fall 2013 Thesis Syllabus 2013

Fall 2013 Annotated Bibliography Assignment

CRAFT OF RESEARCH

From the Diaries and Letters of Kaethe Kollwitz Edited by Hans Kollwitz    Kollwitz Memoir

Thesis Research Bibliographies

Thesis Research; Class Questions

Qualitative and Quantitive Research Methods

2014 Spring

Spring Thesis Research 2014

Required Thesis Parts

Abstract Components

2013 Theses Abstracts

________________________________________________________________________________